Home > Knowledge > Content

Comparison of vinyl ester and polyester resin

Jun 08, 2020

     Article Summary: For many applications, the correct choice between these resins will affect strength, durability, product life, and of course, cost. They have different chemical compositions, and these differences are manifested in physical properties.

    For many applications, the correct choice between these resins will affect strength, durability, product life, and of course, cost. They have different chemical compositions, and these differences are manifested in physical properties. Before choosing them for a specific application, it is important to clearly understand what performance is required for the build. Understanding the differences between these resins will help users compile a list of key material performance factors required for finished products and provide a basis for selection.


    Polyester resin is formed by the reaction between a polyol (such as ethylene glycol or ethylene glycol) and a dibasic acid (such as phthalic acid or maleic acid). These unsaturated resins are combined with other chemicals that are sometimes called hardeners or catalysts. This will change the molecular structure, and the resulting compound will solidify, thereby generating heat in the process. Methyl ethyl ketone peroxide ("MEKP") is one such "hardening" agent.


    Vinyl ester resins are produced by the reaction ("esterification") between epoxy resins and unsaturated monocarboxylic acids. Essentially, they contain the basis of a polyester resin that is reinforced by epoxy molecules in the main chain of the molecular chain. Vinyl esters are also hardened using peroxides (eg MEKP). Both resins can be "diluted" with chemicals such as styrene.

      Source:http://www.up-resin.com/

Back